Friday, 31 July 2015

Finish It Friday: 1/6 Scale Printables

1/6 Scale Printables Guide
I've been working on making up all the printie projects I've spent the last few weeks collecting. It's slow going... You can find my own printable set of miniature Sindy furniture boxes HERE.





Bees Knees Industries
Lots of projects designed for Blythe dolls, from sewing patterns to gift boxes. I used:
Airmail Envelopes.
 Colouring Book.
Seed Packets.



Beth Hayden
This is a super interesting personal blog charting her progress on a course in advertising design. THIS post in particular offers Olbas, Strepsils, and a neat take on Mac packaging. Just use the snip tool and resize in MS Word (or, let's be real, free equivalent).



GI Printables
Weebly site with lots of sixth scale printables - check it out HERE. I made up comics, candy and field rations.



Jason Liebig
Flickr stream of an avid packaging collector. Images are right click protected, but you can just use the snip tool and resize. I made cereal boxes, and chocolate bars / sweets. Because the latter are going to end up so small, you need packaging where the brand name is really clear. I went for things like Wonka bars, Fizz Whizz, and Cadburys Caramilk.



I also made some Pokemon cards (resize pics to 1.2cm in height), Space Raiders, and I printed out new labels for my Re-ment and Barbie CDs - I've been meaning to do this for months after seeing Amber of Sin in the City try it out.



My Froggy Stuff
This woman is amazing - she can make anything out of paper. You can check out her printables HERE, but every post is a tutorial for something. Somehow my attempts never look the same...



One Sixth Warriors
Action figure forum with plenty of printies on offer. THIS thread has medical supplies, while THIS one has lots of electronics. Each thread also has links out to other printable resources, like CyberDrone's collection of mini Star Wars and GI Joe toy boxes.



Print Mini
Loads of printables in all the most common doll house scales. From the 1/6 range I used the floppy disks, cigarette boxes, and some retro style computer paper.



Twisted Plastic
Printables for 1/6 scale action figures - I made the Mr. Sparkle boxes.




Darla Daley is very proud of her cereal collection. I printed on ordinary computer paper, glued it to a brown envelope (so it looks like cardboard), covered the picture side in sellotape (for gloss), then cut the box out and stuck it together.





Thursday, 30 July 2015

Easy

A/N: I wrote this after reading 'Submarine' by Joe Dunthorne and was trying to emulate his style. This was published in the June 2010 edition of online fiction journal, LITSNACK. You can read it THERE, if you prefer. 

Easy adj. Capable of being accomplished or acquired with ease; posing no difficulty.

Cara was the easiest girl in school. Or so everyone said. What little I knew of her did little to convince me otherwise. She wore her skirt two inches above regulation, and Mark Hallet said he'd given her a seeing to behind the bike sheds whilst they'd both been skiving double maths.

You see, where I come from you're guilty until proven innocent when it comes to proper comportment. You either shag any girl who'll have you, or you're a raving bender. My Uncle Arthur says the latter ought to be strung up by their unmentionables. That's the way he speaks, my Uncle Arthur.

Arthur is not my real uncle; he's my mum's new husband. She is a monophobe. So afraid of being alone that she lets Arthur press bruises onto her milky white forearms and keep the bank cards to their joint account in his own overstuffed wallet. Some other phobias you might like to know about include:

- Phalacrophobia. Fear of becoming bald.
- Ranidaphobia. Fear of frogs.
- Primeisodophobia. Fear of losing one's virginity.

"I don't 'ave all day," is what Cara says when we get back to her house. A tea party of dolls stare up at me with sinister intent, she tells me she shares a room with her sister. I fumble with the buttons of her blouse and she watches me disinterestedly as I transform from a boy into a man.

It doesn't feel any different and, when I tell Cara I'm leaving, she doesn't bother to show me out. Uncle Arthur claps me on the back when he finds out, and Mark Hallet makes up dirty jokes all through combined physics. Cara never says a word to me again, and my mum leaves a belated box of little foil wrappers on my bedside table.

Putting out is easy I will later tell my own son, it's the bringing up that's the hard part.

Wednesday, 29 July 2015

Hitting The Road

Originally written in August 2012. Since then public transport has only become more expensive and less frequent - revised figures are in square brackets. Hurrah for Cameron's Britain, I guess...

Back in 2010 David Cameron told us that he wanted to head ‘the greenest government ever’.

Given his track record it isn’t all that shocking to find that he is failing at it. Abysmally.

I could talk about cuts to solar panel and insulation schemes while energy tariffs soar, or the Chancellor’s opinion that green policies represent a ‘ridiculous cost’ to British industry. But, today, I want to go with the Tory-led government’s attitude to public transport.

Norman Tebbit told the public to get on their bikes to find employment in the 1980s - if an area is economically challenged, those who can should move away.

More specifically I want to talk about Iain Duncan Smith’s advice to ‘get on a bus’ to find work. Always supposing, of course, that you can find a bus to get on. In Duncan Smith’s example, travelling from Merthyr Tydfil to Cardiff, the last bus home leaves at 11:06pm from the capital. Inhabitants of other depressed Welsh towns aren’t so lucky.

Blaenavon is about the same distance away from Cardiff as Merthyr, but that is where the similarities in your commuting experience end. There is no direct service from Blaenavon to Cardiff, rather you need to switch at Pontypool or Cwmbran and catch the X3 (latest return from Cardiff at 5:45pm), double back into Abergavenny, or perhaps catch the X24 into Newport to take the train. You would then need to be back in Newport by 9:30pm to get back to Blaenavon. The latter option is more convenient – but convenience costs you. A Stagecoach day ticket is £6.60 [£7.50], over an hour’s pay if you’re on minimum wage, before you have even factored in £4.60 [£4.90] for the train fare.

This example supposes that your job doesn’t involve working on Sundays or bank holidays, in which case you probably just will not be able to get there on time.

The trusty X24, taking you from Blaenavon to Newport every 10 minutes (on peak). For more on Stagecoach South Wales, click HERE.

Using public transport to get around, as we have learned, can be very difficult. And employers understand this. In fact, they understand it so well that many of them explicitly state that they only want employees who have their own transport. In order to claim JSA – Job Seeker’s Allowance, now hitting the heady heights of £53.45 [£57.90] per week for single people aged under 25 – you need to be actively seeking work within 15 miles of your home address. Based on this criteria a basic job search using my own address on jobseekers.direct.gov.uk brought up 250 vacancies.

21% required applicants to have their own transport. A further 8% stated a full driving licence was required, or that having their own transport would be an advantage to applicants. Without considering any other aspect of the vacancy, from necessary qualifications to pay and conditions, over a quarter of available jobs are closed to non-drivers.

However switching from non-driver to driver is an expensive process. An average driving lesson costs £24, and it takes an average of 47 lessons to pass the test. Then there is the cost of acquiring a car, and insuring it, and running it. The price of diesel has reached a record high, and the cost of car insurance is becoming increasingly prohibitive. The average cost for a young male driver is now £2,997 [c. £2,200]. As the JSA allowance for single young people is only £2,779.40 [£3,010.80] per annum, it’s difficult to see how an unemployed young man could maintain car ownership. [Even with the saving on insurance, the average UK spend on petrol p.a. is still £2,000...]

Horror comedy from The Von Pip Excess.

In a world where car ownership is so expensive, not to mention detrimental to the environment, public transport is a necessity not a luxury. Travelling by public transport reduces carbon dioxide emissions; travelling by train instead of by car can halve the C02 emissions of your journey. Yet prices keep rising, and subsides keep falling. England is facing a 20% cut to its Bus Service Operators Grant, and in a few months similar cuts are befalling operators in Wales.

It is not enough for the government – any government – to spout pretty words on this subject. There needs to be a real commitment to making public transport an affordable and efficient public service. It is not acceptable that in 2012, when the environmental impact is well understood, that people should be penalized for not driving.

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

The Ugly Dachshund

Proving that having children really is all about reliving your own childhood, my mum bought Marianna a copy of The Ugly Dachshund on DVD this week. It's a Disney live-action comedy from 1966.


When Fran (Suzanne Pleshette) Garrison's prize Doxie, Danke, gives birth to puppies, husband Mark (Dean Jones) uses the opportunity to sneak home a rejected Great Dane puppy he names Brutus. No angel by any stretch of the imagination, Brutus still takes the blame for the Doxies' bad behaviour. Over and over again. Until, after the destruction of Mark's art studio and the ruination of Fran's big party, he saves the day - and one of his Doxie siblings from the garbage truck.


By the end he even manages to win at a local dog show - despite not being quite convinced he isn't a doxie... If anything it was even cuter than I remembered!

It was also this film which convinced me the Hollywood separate beds were really the way to go!

Monday, 27 July 2015

Rough Guide To Roughly Twelfth Scale Dolls

1/12th Scale Doll Guide

To aid my own failing memory, here is a rough guide to roughly 1/12 scale dolls - i.e. dolls which will work in a standard scale doll house. Before I moved into the world of 1/6 (Barbie scale), 1/12 was where it was at for me. And what I wanted more than anything was a set of fully articulated, true to scale, dressable dolls to grace my lovingly decorated doll house. There are amazing doll artists working in 1/12, like Natasha Yaskova, which I have listed, but for those of us without the necessary disposable income there are alternatives out there. If you know where to look.

In 1/12 scale an adult doll should be roughly 14cm tall, so I won't be including a lot of Tiny BJDs because they tend to have very childlike proportions - e.g. Ai Dolls, Angell-StudioAquarius Doll, Blue Fairy, Bobobie, CrobidollDarak Doll, DD-Anne, Doll Factory Pets, Doll FamilyDoll Leaves, Dollsoom, DollZone, Doma DollDust of Dolls, Hujoo, ImplDollIrrealDoll, iXdollJaime DollLatidoll, LeeelLuts Delf, Mudoll Brownies, Obitsu, Orient DollPipos, RaMcube, Rosen Lied, Volks Tinies, WithDoll, Xaga Doll, etc. Nor will I be listing immovable figurines, or traditional doll house dolls with soft torsos or pipe cleaner joints. Action figures are out due to their molded on clothing. Some of the dolls listed here will be a little too tall to be truly in scale - and a little too lacking in articulation to meet my exacting standards - but their clothes, shoes, heads and accessories are still ripe for the picking!

If you have the skills, you could always have a go at making your own. THIS tutorial walks you through it, though I doubt my attempt would look much like that...



*Pictures all come from other websites / google searches. I claim no credit for them.*



Aleah Klay
Probably best known for her tiny animal sculptures, Klay is also the mastermind behind Orli, a 10.6cm elf BJD. You can check out her blog HERE.




Amelia Thimble
Her head's oversized, but she is just 4" tall. She was always going to make it onto this list as she is probably the best known 1/12 scale BJD on the market, produced by Wilde Imagination.




Awsumgal
Doll artist with her own range of tiny 7" BJDs called Lux dolls. Read more HERE at her blog.




Anna Hardman
Doll artist who sculpts 1/12 figures and BJDs. Check out her Facebook page HERE and her website HERE. The doll in the picture is Lizbeth, a 15cm tall porcelain BJD.




Barbie
There is nothing Barbie hasn't done, including being miniaturised in various scales. For our purposes, check out the 6" Barbie Mini Kingdom dolls from the mid 2000s. 
  • Family Corners. A wholesome Mattel line from the 1990s consisting of married couples, cardboard house fronts and babies. 
  • Princess Tenko (and the Guardians of Magic). Another mid '90s Mattel line of miniature fashion doll.
  • You may be able to utilise some of the clothing, etc from Barbie's younger sisters. In the current line up there is Chelsea, a 15cm doll, and before her there was Shelly (Kelly) and Tommy (Ken's brother) who were about 12cm. There is a great reference site for Shelly at lilfriends.net and see HERE for some of her numerous clones and knock offs. Back before any of them, Barbie had 6.25" tall cousins Tutti and Todd (and their friends) - read more HERE.






Bild Lilli
The Bild Lilli doll, based on a comic strip in Bild-Zeitung (lit. Picture Newspaper), was first produced in Germany in 1955. From the beginning she was sold in two sizes, 12 inches and 7.5 inches. And, almost right from the beginning, there were clone dolls galore. Read more HERE.
  • Cherie. The result of Lilli molds leased to Chang-Pi Su Co. (PIC)
  • Cragstan made Missy (PIC), Cindy (PIC) and Liza (PIC) who was more of a Genevieve clone. Liza even had a 7.5" high boyfriend called Bob.
  • Gina Ann Modes. Cheap clone doll. (PIC)
  • Miss MarleneThis 7.5" doll was first produced as a Bild Lilli clone - with the agreement of Hausser - in 1960 by Marx Toys. Then it turned out Marx had lost out to Mattel when it came to licensing, and in 1962 the Lilli clone became Miss Marlene. Read more HERE. In 1964 she gained new joints to become fully posable, like the company's Bonnie doll.
  • Mi-Mi. (PIC)
  • Miss Cissie. (PIC)
  • Miss Sweetheart. The British made (i.e. Hong Kong made) miniature teenage doll. There were 16 of them altogether. Example pic.
  • Paula. The usual name for the Spanish Munecas FEJ Lilli.
  • Tracy Sue. (PIC)




Breyer Dolls
Breyer are best known for their model horses. But those horses need riders, and Breyer also produce a range of 6" to 8" inch dolls for the purpose. You can get riders, vets and pet groomers - take a look HERE at their website.




Bubble Belles
Kenner dolls from 1990, they were 7" high and came with inflatable accessories for 'bath time fun'. Indeed. Ghostofthedoll has a reference page for them HERE.




Cassy
Introduced by Hornby in 1992, Cassy stood 7 and 1/2 inches tall and was typically packaged in a large plastic cassette along with decor and accessories. These cassettes could be collected and joined together to build Cassy a house, complete with stables and dance studio. We had a big bundle of Cassy stuff a few months back and I was impressed with the merger between fashion doll and construction toy, from the working lights to the ability to reconfigure the house any way you liked. Cassy soon faded into obsecurity, and can be picked up dirt cheap on Ebay and the like. See HERE for more info.
  • Flower Fairies. Before Cassy, Hornby had a lot of success with these 7" dolls between '83 and '89. Not particularly attractive dolls, they do however have some very pretty dresses. There is a fairly comprehensive page for them over at ghostofthedoll




Celebrity Dolls
Generally speaking, if you're going to be immortalised in plastic, it will tend to be in 1/6 (Barbie) or 1/8 (Mego) scale. Some celebs do get their own smaller models though...
  • Aaron Carter. Play Along Toys brought out a Aaron Carter range in 2001. They were dark days. 
  • Britney Spears. Again produced by Play Along Toys, a range of 6 and half inch Britney dolls were released around 2000. You can check them out HERE
  • I Dream of Jeannie. Everyone loves TV show tie-ins, not least toy company Remco who produced these dolls in the 1970s. For info see HERE, HERE and HERE.
  • Mandy Moore. Another 6" offering from Play Along Toys.




Charles' Creature Cabinet
If you're wanting anthropomorphised animals or tiny 8cm faeries for your collection, look no further. Their website is HERE, and you can buy the faeries through JpopDolls HERE for $329 (£192).




Coraline
To tie-in with the 2009 stop-motion film of the same name, dolls were released in a range of sizes. As far as this post is concerned, the ones to look out for are a set of three 7" bendable dolls with removable clothing. Read more HERE.




Costume Dolls
The type of dolls picked up as holiday souvenirs, or found for pittance at the local car boot sale, with a 99% chance they began life in a Hong Kong factory. Cheap and nasty with their hollow plastic bodies, and glued on clothing. But, all the same, sometimes they have something worth salvaging - and are often small enough for that something to suit the 1/12 collector's needs. These are also the kind of dolls that might have ended up in toilet roll holders, or as angel Christmas tree toppers. Embrace the kitsch.




Daisy Dayes
Doll artist who has made a range of 1/12 BJDs, including a 17cm tall centaur. You can find her on DeviantArt, Etsy, and Blogger. You can buy current dolls through JpopDolls for around $200 (£117).




Derry Daring
The girl's answer to Evel Kneivel figures, Ideal's Derry Daring was a real contrast to most dolls on the market in the 1970s. While they were busy modelling and working on their suntans, Derry Daring was off on adventures in her wheelie car or Baja camper as shown on her Who's that Doll? page. What a gal.




Disney
Disney princesses are everywhere, and the world of small fashion dolls is no exception. Both Disney itself, and Mattel, have churned out small Princess and fairy dolls over the years. 
  • W.I.T.C.H. Giochi Preziosi did a line of 6" dolls for this show under licence in 2003. See HERE.




Dobigi
Defunct BJD company which made a 17cm doll named Alice. They were also sold for a time through Luts. Read more HERE.




Dolkot
A BJD company which sells dolls in a range of scales. Their Peya doll is 16cm tall, and sells for $185 (£108). Read more at their website.




Dollmore
'One stop shop' Korean BJD company that produces and sells dolls in a huge range of scales. Their Banji line is 5.7" tall and costs around $200 (£117). You can find the dolls, along with clothing, shoes, eyes and wigs at their website, dollmore.net.




Dreamhigh Studio
BJD company that specalises in micro BJDs ranging from 14cm to just 5cm high. The elf doll in the picture, Zelenia, is a 14cm doll limited to 25 pieces at $262 (£153) each. Find out more at their website.




Elfdoll
Well known BJD company that produces dolls in a range of scales. Their tiny BJDs are 14cm tall and cost around $200 (£117). You can see their full collection at elfdollshop.com.




Eve Dolls
They produce very realistic looking 1/12 BJDs, check out their website HERE. The assembled doll costs $699 (£407).




Fairyland
BJD company that produces dolls in a range of scales. Their Puki line ranges from 15.5cm to 9.7cm high - the doll in the picture is the smaller RealPuki. Find out more at their website.




Figma
Most of these 12th scale action figures come nowhere near fitting my requirements - blast their molded plastic hair and clothing! However a look through their back catalogue reveals a few nude or nearly nude usable figures. In the picture we have their Billy Herrington figure, a beloved legend among Japanese gay porn aficionados. Prices tend to be about £30 ($50), but the rarer / more sought after the figure, the more you can expect to pay. As ever.




Garden of Dolls
BJDs in a range of sizes, but Nabiyette the fairy is just 5.5" tall. You can view them on the website and purchase them from the Etsy shop for around £130 ($220).




Garmonsway
Fully articulated, true to scale, realistic looking male dolls. Be still my beating heart! You can purchase one for about £80 ($135) on Etsy, or covet from afar via the Tumblr blog. As if that wasn't enough, a female doll is currently in development.




Heidi Ott
The first fully jointed 1/12 scale dolls I ever encountered, and still one of the best value brands out there with nude dolls costing about £25 ($43). You can get men and women in light and dark skin tones, and in young or a more mature body shapes. The hands pop free for easy dressing, and Heidi Ott also sells a range of wigs, shoes and clothing for them. They also sell scale teen, child and baby dolls, but they lack the articulation. Check them all out at the official website.




Ilianna Artwork
Russian doll artist who makes 1/12 scale BJDs. The doll in the picture is currently up for sale on Ebay for $444 (£259).




Inae Mogi
Mogi is a doll artist who makes 1/12 scale adults and children. You can check out their Flickr HERE.




Jean Reid
Reid of Les Petits Tresors is best known for her baby sculpts, but they have also made some awesome 1/12 scale child dolls. They have a Facebook page HERE.




Karens Mini Bears
Another doll artist mostly known for her non jointed 1/12 baby and toddler figures, but who has also produced some articulated scale dolls. Check out her Facebook page HERE or look her up on Ebay.




Koitsukihime
An amazing Japanese doll artist, they released a jointed 14cm BJD to accompany an art book a few years back. You can see a video review HERE. For more on Koitsukihime in general, their official website is HERE.




Konami MMS
Highly articulated bodies were developed for their Bosou Shinki (lit. Armament God Princess) figures. The picture shows the larger and smaller versions side by side. You can still pick these up, generally costing between £100 and £200 ($170 - $340). INFO.




Lillycat Cerisedolls
French BJD company that make some beautiful 1/12 - and other - scale dolls. The picture is of Colline, a 17cm doll, who was selling for £225 ($385) without face up. Check out their other dolls at their website.




Little Big Man
Palitoy produced this 7" Action Man (G.I. Joe) wannabe in the 1970s. Read more at plaidstallions.com.




Locksies
Inspired by the success of the Harumika range, Bandai produced Locksies are all about designing and customising clothing for your doll. Their RRP as of 2014 is £10.99 ($19) but, let's be honest, they're pretty ugly - that price is bound to come down on the shelves. For more info see HERE and HERE.




Lottie
At 18cm tall, and designed to be a child doll, Lottie's only just edging her way onto this list. However she's a fairly slim doll, and has some very well made clothing. Plus she's still being manufactured, by a British company no less! Her official website is HERE.




Madelman
Madelman is a scaled down Action Man (G.I. Joe) best known in Spain. First produced in 1968, Madelman is 17cm tall and has all the kind of gear you'd associate with the regular sized Action Man. He's still going today, and is well worth an Ebay search. The short lived Madelman 2050 line was introduced in 1989 with a sci-fi theme, read more about that HERE. He has his own forum HERE and is the star of blogs like THIS ONE. There is even a female figure.




Mego
Mego Corporation was a toy company that, in the words of Wikipedia, dominated the action figure toy market during most of the 1970s. They made hundreds of different action figures (i.e. dolls) to tie in with comics, films, TV shows, etc. Generally speaking the standard size for their dressable dolls was 8" high, but they did have some smaller lines like the Pippa wannabe 6.5" Dizzy Girls and the 6.5" Our Gang dolls (see HERE). For Mego toys in general, check out the extensive megomuseum.com and foreignmego.com.




Marika
At 14cm tall, Marika is a true to scale BJD from SolerS. You can buy her HERE, with face up, for a very reasonable $160 (c. £94).




Mary Anderson Miniatures
Gorgeous true to scale adult BJDs. Check out her Facebook page HERE for news of Ebay sales. I believe they are from the same artist as Paws of Love Miniatures, who specialises in 1/12 animals.




McDonalds
Happy Meal dolls are often a good fit for this scale, or else have clothing and accessories worth utilising. The Mulan figure above was out in 1998, and mine lived in my childhood doll house. I still have the skirt in my stash of 1/12 scale clothing. There are archives of Happy Meal toys HERE and HERE.




Mewiefish
Doll artist who has made a variety of cool tiny BJDs. Check out their work on their DeviantArt page.




Microdiva
Beautiful 18cm doll from Russia, made in polyurethane. Check out the official website HERE, and the Facebook page HERE.




MonkEyGstudio
Specialising in tiny jointed wooden dolls, they have an Etsy shop and Flickr page for your viewing pleasure.




Monster High
Not technically dolls, these are novelty pens released in 2012. I'm including them because their heads are perfect for rebodying on 1/12th scale bodies. I got the Frankie Stein pen in a swap and put it on a picco neemo body. For an in depth review, see the Toyboxphilosopher.




Moving Dolls
1/12 scale BJDs in porcelain and resin. The picture is of Alena, a 17cm porcelain doll. You can see more of their creations at their DeviantArt page.




Mr Props
If the price of all these artist dolls is getting you down, check out Mr Props on Shapeways, the home of 3D printing. For about £50 ($85) you can bring home the kit for the girl in the picture above. There is also a 1/12 scale man and fully articulated 11cm and 7.4cm doll kits for under £15. I haven't bought any yet as I'm concentrating on 1/6, but it is my intention to turn a few into 1/12 scale children and teens. Watch this space.




Nadiia Evans
Doll artist who makes 1/12 figures and BJDs. She has a website HERE, a blog and a DeviantArt page.




Natasha Yaskova
Yaskova makes BJDs in a range of scales but, most importantly, 1/12th. Just check out that whole family of 1/12 dolls! She has a blog, an Etsy shop and a website.




Numer
Silicon doll body with internal skeleton for posing available from hobby outlets like amiami.com. Perfect for the nudist doll house, and surprisingly only costs around 13,000 yen or £75 ($128). There is a bit more detail on them HERE.




Olga Kolesnikova
Yet another amazing doll artist. HERE is a comparison with other doll house BJDs. I couldn't find any other info out there, so please leave a comment if you know of an official site.




One Of A Kind Gift Shop
Etsy seller who makes 1/12 scale art dolls like the one pictured above, which retails for £90 ($152). Check out their shop HERE.




Pamela Love
17cm tall, Pamela Love was sold by Simba Toys in the 1990s. She had friends, furniture, a devoted boyfriend named Bobby, a motor home... All the trappings of the successful fashion doll. She also had the best outfits in her scale - just look at the above picture. She can be quite hard to get hold of in the UK these days, but keep an eagle eye out while searching Pippa listings. Check out her Flickr pool but be careful when googling; she has the misfortune to share her name with a love doll of an entirely different variety.
  • Little Susanna. Very similar to Pamela Love, and often mistaken for her, this doll was distributed by Padgett Bros (A to Z) Ltd. (PIC)
  • Laura Little. Modern Simba miniature offering. Try searching Amazon.de for playsets like THIS. (PIC)




Picco Neemo
Produced by Azone, Picco Neemo are amazing pieces of construction for their scale, and their price - around $30 (£17.50). They are scaled down versions of the company's Pure Neemo line and, though very slim compared to say, Heidi Ott dolls, they work perfectly in a doll house setting. I put Pippa heads on mine. Azone also produce gorgeous pieces of true to scale clothing, but they tend to cost more than the doll itself. The best place to get hold of these dolls for UK buyers is Mimiwoo.com.




Pippa
6.5" tall, Pippa was sold by Palitoy under the slogan 'the pocket money fashion doll that puts fashion in your pocket' between 1972 and 1980. Pippa had loads of friends, a boyfriend called Pete, and a huge array of groovy 1970s clothing. Pippa remains popular with British collectors, has her own annual convention, and dozens of fansites like pippadoll.net.
  • Between 1970 and 1973 Topper Toys were selling a similar doll in the USA named Dawn. Dawn owned her own modelling ageny and, like Pippa, was caught in a social whirlwind of friends, boyfriends and funky fashions. Dawn has even had brief revivals over the years and she has an in-depth reference site HERE.

Pippa Knock Offs
Okay, so this is a cruel way to characterise them - they may well be Dawn knock offs, after all - but essentially these are the dolls made to cash in on the popularity of Pippa / Dawn. Most links go out to Who's that Doll?, a fantastic resource site for smaller fashion dolls.
  • Adorable Kelly AKA Adorable Debby AKA Kitty AKA Miss Toyerama. Pretty clone doll by unknown manufacturer. (PIC)
  • Biggy. Clone doll by an unknown German manufacturer. (PIC)
  • Cindi Joy. Mort Alexander Toy Company released two generations of this girl, using different headmolds.
  • Debbie. Clone doll by Action-Lobeco Corp. (PIC)
  • Debbie Teen. Just another clone doll.
  • Diana. Most famously marketed by Day-Fran, some Dianas used their own mold, others were re-packaged Dawn or Pippa dolls.
  • Dizzy Girl. Mego's attempt to cash in on the craze.
  • Doree. Dolls and fashions sold by Speigel department stores.
  • Fashion World. Dandee Toys introduced these in 1970.
  • Forever Yours. (PIC)
  • Holly and Ivy. Weird little flat stanley type dolls sold by Janex. 
  • Ja-Ru. French manufacturer who issued fashion dolls (PIC) and bride dolls (PIC).
  • Jeanie. Just edging in at 7.5" high, these were sold at Kresge department stores. 
  • Julie. Clone doll from unknown manufacturer. (PIC)
  • Lil' Disco Doll / Lil' Fashion Doll. Clone dolls by Funworld. 
  • Lisa. Doll fashions by Day-Fran.
  • Little Miss Dollikin. Scaled down version of Uneeda's Dollikin, they were sold in Woolworths as Triki Miki. 
  • Lulu. Pippa clone sold by Bradgate, Palitoy's wholesale arm. (PIC)
  • Miss Aerobic. Unknown manufacturer.
  • Mod Miss. Early 70s doll from Edico Promotions. 
  • Pride Doll. Swimsuited Hong Kong made dolls marketed by Jolly Toys.
  • RockFlowers. Mattel's way of dealing with the competition. 
  • Tina. Cheapo looking clone by Totsy Toys. (PIC)
  • Tina Mod. Replitoy made good use of liquidated Dawn stock for this one.
  • Tris. 6.5" teen doll made in Hong Kong. 
  • Etc, etc, etc, etc.




Rosen Garden
At just over 18cm, their 1/12 BJD Fleur is beautiful. You can buy her from their website for $339 (£198). 




Sailor Moon
Bandai and Irwin Toys both produced small dolls to tie in with this popular manga and TV show.




Sarah Louise
This scaled down version of Sindy stood 6.5" tall and was sold exclusively by Debenhams. She also had scaled down versions of Sindy's furniture. Lucky girl. Sarah Louise shared her good looks with a number of other dolls:
  • Judy by Zodiac Toys.
  • Little Ballerina dolls were distributed by Ocean Toys. (PIC)
  • Siso, a German toy company, generally sold her as a ballerina. (PIC)




Seed Dolls
Their Inkling doll is 18.5cm tall and comes with 5 interchangeable face plates. Read more HERE at the Seed Dolls website.




Serene Dolls
True to scale adult and child 1/12 dolls made by Lithuanian born artist Giedre Petkute. They have an Etsy store, Facebook, and Flickr. She also makes shoes and clothing which is available for purchase separately. 




Sherman Smith
Doll artist specialising in traditional wooden peg dolls. There are some for sale HERE.




Silverbeam Dolls
Etsy based doll artist who produces a range of 1/12 scale 3D printed BJDs. The mermaid above can be purchased in a range of options, starting from £40 ($68). Check out their Etsy shop HERE, their Shapeways shop HERE, their DeviantArt HERE, or their Facebook page HERE.




Sindy
Introduced as a Tammy licencee by Pedigree in 1963, Sindy was the best selling doll in the UK through until the 1980s. By the 90s Barbie was taking over, and in the 2000s New Moon tried to inject some life into the brand by re-imagining Sindy as a 6.5" preteen doll. You can read more about the failed venture HERE. You can still pick them up NRFB from discount Amazon sellers.
  • Before Sindy shrunk in size, she had a 6" cousin called Betsy with the same kind of body used for Barbie's cousin Tutti. You can read more about Betsy HERE and HERE.




Sleeping Elf
Tinybear is well known in the BJD world for mohair wigs and self sculpted dolls. There are a range of 1/12 scale dolls, around 14cm high and, though the heads are oversized, the bodies are mature. You can buy them from her website for around $200 (£117) each.




Starr Model Agency
6.5" tall dolls produced by Jakks Pacific in mid 1990s. They had lots of accompanying fashions and regularly come up for sale on Ebay. Read more about them HERE, and HERE
  • Fairytale Favourites. Another line of small dolls from Jakks Pacific.
  • FreshLook Petites. Jakks line from the early 2000s, more info HERE.




Sutherland Art Studio
Talented doll artist who works in a range of scales. The doll above sold for $450 (£260). You can check their blog out HERE




Takara Compact Jenny
Jenny is a 1/6 scale doll who started life as a licensed Japanese Barbie. Today she's a trendier, more grown up version of Takara stablemate, Licca-chan, but at that height it was only a matter of time before she got a miniaturised release. Compact Jenny and friends stand 6" tall, and have rubbery bodies with internal wire skeletons for posing. 




ThreeA
AKA 3A AKA Ashley Wood. They make a range of 1/6 and 1/12 scale fully articulated action figures (or, you know, dolls). Expect to pay upwards of £100 ($170) for the 1/12 scale line. Check out the official website HERE, or reviews HERE, HERE and HERE.



Topper Go-Gos and Tigers
The Go-Gos were a collection of posable 7" girl dolls from the 1960s. The Tigers were the boys' equivalent. For more info see HERE.




Twelvemo
12th scale BJD made by artist Sarah Beare. You can buy the basic doll on Etsy for £250 ($428). She also has a website and a blog.




Vogue-Lesney
In the 1970s Lesney produced a range of little dolls under the brand names Suky, Susy and, most famously, Miss Matchbox. In the 1980s the merged Vogue-Lesney updated their mini dolls with the Glitter Girl brand. Crafty Doll Gal has a dedicated page with more info HERE




Smaller Dolls -

These brands may be good for customising 1/12 child dolls, or just for handing over their shoes, clothing and accessories.
  • Adorables4" dolls sold at Sears department stores.
  • American Girl Minis. 6.5" tall, but with child like bodies, these dolls may nevertheless have some useful clothing and accessories. You can see the full range on the AG website.
  • Bliss BJD. Etsy shop selling tiny 6.5cm micro BJDs. Check it out HERE.
  • Boo Boos Care. Hornby dolls from 1985. More info HERE.
  • Conjured Imagination. Etsy shop selling 3D printed 4" BJDs. The shop is HERE.
  • Cover Girl. 4" dolls sold by Italian company Ceppi Ratti. Example HERE.
  • Dazzle. 4.5" - 5" dolls made by Mattel between 1981 and 1983. More info HERE
  • Designer Dolls. 4" dolls produced by Lanard, they also did a tie in range with Simplicity sewing fashions.
  • Dixie's Diner. Tyco produced dolls and playsets from 1988-89. More info HERE.
  • Dol Toi. 1/16 scale doll house dolls. (PIC)
  • Dolly Darling. 4.5" dolls produced by Hasbro in the 1960s. Read more HERE.
  • Eighteen Doll. Produced by Lash Tamaron between 1981 and 1983 the line included 9 different 4" characters. See HERE for more info.
  • Fashion Gal. Produced by Nasta between 1981 and 1983, these dolls are 4" tall. Info HERE.
  • Fashion Teeners. 4" dolls produced by Mattel between 1971 and 1972. Dedicated page HERE.
  • Glamour Gals. These early 1980s Kenner produced dolls were 4.25". Read more HERE, and HERE.
  • Herself the Elf. 5" dolls produced by Mattel in 1982. More info HERE.
  • High School Musical. Mattel released a range of 4.5" tie in dolls in 2008. More HERE.
  • Hollywoods. Crazy colourful 5" dolls from Tonka back in 1987/1988. More HERE.
  • Honey Hill Bunch. 4" dolls produced by Mattel between 1976 and 1978. They have cloth bodies, but plastic rooted heads. See HERE.
  • Kidgetts. 1.25" high dolls produced by Meritus in 1989/1990. More info HERE.
  • Kishlet. 4" dolls by Nancy Kish. (PIC)
  • Konji Doll. 4" high dolls that sold for around $17 (£10) in the mid 2000s. More HERE.
  • Krystal Princesses. Playskool dolls from 1992, they have a ghostofthedoll page HERE.
  • Liddle Kiddles. Around 3" tall, these dolls were produced by Mattel  between 1966 and 1970. Read more HERE, HERE and HERE
  • Life Savers. Remco range of little dolls from the early '80s. More HERE.
  • Lil' Bratz / Bratz Kidz. Miniature Bratz figures from the 2000s. Wiki has a rundown of releases HERE.
  • Little Pullip, Dal, Taeyang and Byul. About 4.5" high, these dolls have awesome outfits. See release lists for them HERE.
  • Lundby Doll House dolls. About 4" tall, you can check out all the modern dolls on their website.
  • Luv Buds. 2" high flower dolls produced by Buddy L. Corp in 1982. More info HERE.
  • Merwees. 3" mermaid doll produced by Cap Toys in 1997. Info HERE.
  • Miki. (AKA Kim AKA Dana) 6" Uneeda hair growing doll from the 70s. Has the baby type body which is why she is listed here in the potentially useful section. More info HERE.
  • Mini Candi. 4" doll by unknown manufacturer. (PIC)
  • Miss Sergio Valente. 4" dolls produced by Toy Time in the early 1980s.
  • Moon Dreamers. 5.5" tall, their clothes will probably need taking in - but they are awesome. Ghostofthedoll page HERE.
  • Moxie Girlz Friends. Miniature versions of the 10" Moxie Girlz line. Read more HERE.
  • My Magic Genies. Line of small dolls produced in 1995 by Kenner, see HERE.
  • Nancy Ann. Nancy Ann Storybook Dolls came in a range of sizes, but the 4" - 5" are the most interesting in terms of this post. Read more HERE.
  • Natalie White BJDs. 3.5" human and anthro dolls. Check out her Facebook page.
  • NotDoll Nari-pon. 10cm tall BJD. Read more HERE.
  • Our Generation Mini Dolls. About 7" tall but with chunky childlike bodies, very similar to the American Girl miniature dolls. Read more HERE.
  • Peak's Woods. Korean BJD company known for making fairy dolls. Their Monthly Fairies line are 10cm tall. Check out their website HERE.
  • Pee Wee. Uneeda dolls first produced in 1965 at 3.5" tall, later incarnations were 4.5". Palitoy did their own knock off version called Diddums. Read more HERE.
  • Petal People. 2.5" dolls made by Uneeda in the late '60s. THIS page has a small section on them, just scroll down.
  • Petite Blythe / Littlest Pet Shop Blythe. These figures are about 4.5" high. Read more HERE and HERE.
  • Pocketbook Dolls. 4.5" to 5.5" tall dolls made by Remco in the late 1960s. More info HERE.
  • Polly Pocket. Originally less than an inch high, they later became a mini fashion doll at 3.75" high. Their rubbery clothing and shoes can come in very handy. Onlypollypocket.com is a great resource site - but only for the earlier kind of doll.
  • Secretdoll. A Korean BJD company with a 10cm tall Baby Fairy line, see more HERE
  • Takara Microman and Microlady Material Force. 3" to 4" figures blank figures in various colours. Wiki has more information.
  • Tiny Time Teen. About 5.5" high, these late 1960s Uneeda dolls looked similar to Dolly Darlings. Read more HERE
  • Tonka. Little doll house dolls with jointed knees. (PIC)
  • Tri-ang. 1/16 scale doll house dolls for Jenny's Home and the like.
  • Ty Li'L Ones. 11.5cm tall dolls which are miniature version of Ty Girlz. More HERE and HERE.
  • Tyco Quints Cousins. The quints themselves were babies, but they had a trio of 5" cousins who babysat them. Ghostofthedoll has a good reference page HERE.
  • Wee Wild Things. 1.5" tall dolls produced by Mattel in 1987. See HERE.
  • Wish World Kids. Late 1980s 4" poseable dolls from Kenner, read more HERE
  • Yummi Land. 5" dolls produced by MGA in the mid 2000s. Read more HERE.


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