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Rinse and Repeat

Do you rinse your washing up?

I stumbled across this debate while randomly browsing the web the other day. The arguments on both sides were impassioned - almost frighteningly so! - so now I'm going to ask my own readers. Do you rinse your washing up? Or do you not?

Outside of the UK rinsing is very much the norm. To not rinse, at least according to the comment boards on popular tabloid websites, is a shocking idea. In the UK we have few such scruples; we just take the dishes from the soapy bowl and plonk them on the drainer.

Some argue much of the blame can be placed at the door of ad agencies. If the Fairy Liquid lady didn't rinse, why would Mrs Smith? Besides, if our washing up liquid was so mild, it couldn't be doing us much harm. Which is largely true unless you're rubbing it into your eyes or drinking it straight from the bottle. It won't taste nice, but soap residue won't do much beyond possibly result in an upset tummy.

Britain's answer to Sesame Street, Rainbow, shows us how to wash up in the 1970s. They're using Fairy Liquid which still accounts for about 60% of all washing up liquid (dish detergent) sold in the UK. It built its reputation on being mild on the hands and long-lasting value for money.

Saying that, I'm really finicky and have always tended to rinse under a running tap - much to my eco-conscious dad's horror! I also rinse stuff again before using. But I'm not so bad that I won't eat or drink from dishes someone else has washed up and not rinsed. I looked to Mother (the advice column of 1950s Girl magazine) and she concurred:

Mother tells you how to wash the dishes
Click for a larger view.

I'm worse with stuff which has been in a dishwasher to be honest. I've never had a home one, but I used to work in a hospital kitchen and memories of cleaning the gunk out of the filter (and re-cleaning all the items other people didn't wash up first, sigh) have put me off them.

How about you?







Comments

  1. I'm a rinser! Those fairy adverts have always bothered me, seeing the plates on the drainer still covered in bubbles! I didn't realise this was a hot debate topic though! x #BloggerClubUK

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    1. It was from a few years ago, but the comment board I stumbled on was really vicious! x

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  2. I love my dishwasher, LOVE it. It has stopped many a washing up related argument. When I do do the washing up I like to rinse the glasses, with hot water running water, it dries them quicker and you don't get bubble marks, but I get less bothered with plates and certainly don't worry about pots and pans. So I don't know where that leaves me in the to rinse or not to rinse argument. #BloggerClubUK

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    1. Hehe, I'm definitely more finicky with glass and flatware than I am with everything else. The worst is when you go out to eat and their forks aren't clean. D:

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  3. Rinsing makes it quicker to dry. I saw a brilliant BBC documentary on Japan where a woman didn't use soap at all. She used fish!

    #BloggerClubUK

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    1. Okay, I need to track that down on YouTube!! :)

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  4. Yeah I'm a rinser! My husband doesn't though...and I rinse things thoroughly before putting them in the dishwasher which he always claims is pointless. I blame my parents, they were always very particular!! #KCACOLS

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    1. I think I'd drive my other half mad if we had a dishwasher! x

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  5. Ahhhh yes I rinse! And get a lot of stick for it too! My parents have a water meter at their house and my dad develops a nervous twitch when I offer to wash up...�� But I think a rinse is essential to check the item is clean! �� Kathy xx #KCACOLS

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  6. Ha ha this is so random! I don't rinse I'm afraid! I don't use Fairy either, I use Ecover so it dealt have the same level of chemicals. It's so diluted by the time it's in a saving up bowl I don't think it can do that much harm xx #kcacols

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    1. No, nor me - you'd have to be using massive amounts for it to be a problem, I think!

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  7. I'm a rinser! I also rinse before putting things in the dishwasher too! #KCACOLS

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  8. I'm a rinser! it better and quicker drying time! #KCACOLS

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  9. I have a dishwasher and I tend to give things a rinse before I put them in there. I never rinsed before we had the dishwasher, I didn't realise this was a thing lol.
    #KCACOLS

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    1. I'd never thought about it until I read the article either :)

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  10. What, do people think a smidge of soap might make them ill, or do they think it's bad for the environment? If it's really sudsy I'll give it a rinse, otherwise I'll just chuck it on the drainer and let it drip off. Thank you for linking with #KCACOLS and hope to see you again next week.

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    1. As far as I could tell it was the health aspect - it was building up and poisoning....

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  11. I rinse under running water after hand washing. I do put a lot in the dishwasher though as I feel that gives a better clean & rinse than I do. I don't re-rinse before using though. Thanks so much for sharing with us at #BloggerClubUK x

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    1. It's been really interesting to hear what other people do! :)

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  12. I'm a rinser. I don't know if it is reasonable or not, but I have it in my head that leaving any kind of soap residue will upset our stomachs the next time we use them. probably no truth whatsoever to that. #KCACOLS

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    1. It depends on how much soap is left on, I think - you can definitely taste it sometimes which isn't nice!

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  13. Ha ha I HAD to click on this when I saw it. OMG. You have NO idea how appalled Indian people are by the idea of not rinsing dishes. Honestly, when I go to my erm, ooh how do I put this?: houses of not-Indian people (who may possibly be erm English) I have to say my prayers when I see them just putting the dishes on the side soapy suds and all. Eeeewwww. You don't leave the shower gel on or the shampoo in your hair (not you you I mean general you) so WHY not rinses dishes?! #bloggerclubuk

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    1. Hehe, since reading the original article I keep watching out for it in every TV show, etc, to see what they're doing with their dishes! xD

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  14. Hahahahaha! I had no idea this was an actual debate-a heated one at that!
    I usually just toss them in the dishwasher-but last week our dishwasher went out, so I've been doing the dishes by hand ): But yes, they are ALWAYS rinsed. Maybe I'm a little OCD in that area, but I can't stand one forgotten soap sud haha! #KCACOLS

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    1. It's the worst when you have a cup of tea or something and you can still taste the washing up liquid!

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